Fire Prevention

The primary responsibility of the Fire Official is the enforcement of the New Jersey Uniform Fire Code and other local fire safety regulations. Major activities within the scope of this office include:
  • Fire investigations to determine origin and cause
  • Fire permit control
  • Fire safety complaints
  • Inspections of life hazard uses
  • Inspections of nonlife hazard uses (except owner-occupied one- and two-family dwellings)
New Jersey Uniform Fire Code
The purpose of this code is to establish the minimum requirements consistent with nationally recognized good practice for providing a reasonable level of life safety and property protection from the hazards of fire, explosion or dangerous conditions in new and existing buildings, structures and premises and to provide safety to fire fighters and emergency responders during emergency operations.

Safety Provisions

The Uniform Fire Code is designed to assure that fire safety provisions in existing buildings are maintained and that specific target hazards are retrofitted with fire protection systems, fire resistive construction or other fire safety features that the state has identified as benefiting the health, safety and welfare of the public.

Building Categories
Buildings and their associated occupancies are broken down in 2 categories, Life Hazard Uses and Nonlife Hazard Uses. Life Hazard Uses (LHU's) must be registered with the state. Both Life Hazard Uses and Nonlife Hazard Uses are inspected in accordance with the code. The UFC is provides for temporary situations such as special events, tents, canopies, construction site safety and use of flame producing equipment.

Cold Weather Safety

- Carbon Monoxide Kills Every Year -

During New Jersey’s 2017 – 2018 heating season, the state’s poison control center received approximately 250 calls related to carbon monoxide (CO). Of these, 162 victims were evaluated in emergency departments and many required hospitalization.

Don’t be the poison center’s next statistic. Exposure to carbon monoxide can produce headaches, sleepiness, fatigue, confusion and irritability at low levels. At higher levels, it can result in nausea, vomiting, irregular heartbeat, impaired vision and coordination, and death. During cold and influenza season, symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning can easily be confused with symptoms of viral illnesses like the common cold and the flu.

Safety tips to help reduce your risk of carbon monoxide exposure:

  1. If you do not have any carbon monoxide detectors, install them right away. If your detectors are old and/or not working properly, replace them immediately.
  2. Don’t remove the batteries from detectors to use somewhere else. The detector can only save lives if it works.
  3. Gas appliances must have adequate ventilation. If need be, keep a window slightly cracked to allow airflow.
  4. Open flues when fireplaces are in use. Have chimneys inspected periodically to prevent blockage.
  5. Never use the stove to heat your home/apartment.
  6. Only use generators outside. Keep them more than 20 feet from both you and your neighbor’s home, doors, or windows.
  7. Do not bring generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves, or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage, carport, camper, boat cabin, or tent – or even outside near an open window or door.
  8. DO NOT cook with charcoal indoors.
  9. DO NOT idle a car in a closed garage. Once you pull in, immediately turn off the engine. Be extra careful with “remote start” engines which may be on without your knowledge.

If you suspect a carbon monoxide exposure, take immediate action: 

  1. If someone is unconscious or unresponsive, get him or her out of the house and call 9-1-1 immediately.
  2. Exit the house/building immediately. Do not waste time opening windows. This will delay your escape and cause you to breathe in even more dangerous fumes.
  3. Contact your local fire department/energy provider.
  4. Call the NJ Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 for immediate medical treatment advice. Do not waste time looking for information on the internet about carbon monoxide poisoning. Call us for fast, free and accurate information.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is serious. If you have questions or concerns about carbon monoxide or suspect CO exposure, call the medical professionals at the NJ Poison Control Center. If someone is unconscious, not breathing, hard to wake up, or seizing, call 9-1-1 immediately. Poison control centers are a great resource for information and emergencies. Call, text, or chat with a health professional for free, 24/7. Save the Poison Help line, 1-800-222-1222, in your phone today to be prepared for what may happen tomorrow, (www.njpies.org).